Sunday, August 12, 2007

the Father's Love

I love the comedy show "Seinfeld," and one episode that stuck in my mind and recently resurfaced is "The Burning." Part of the plot is that Elaine's dim-bulb boyfriend Puddy turns out to be a Christian. She's disappointed for two reasons.... because one of the attractions was that he was so one-dimensional.

A further issue, and the one I've been thinking about, is that Puddy didn't seemed to care that Elaine was going to hell. He believed, but it didn't make any difference to him that she didn't.


Then in this morning's Office of Readings I read this from Catherine of Siena:

My sweet Lord, look with mercy upon your people and especially upon the mystical body of your Church. Greater glory is given to your name for pardoning a multitude of your creatures than if I alone were pardoned for my great sins against your majesty. It would be no consolation for me to enjoy your life if your holy people stood in death.

For I see that sin darkens the life of your bride the Church – my sin and the sins of others.It is a special grace I ask for, this pardon for the creatures you have made in your image and likeness. When you created man, you were moved by love to make him in your own image. Surely only love could so dignify your creatures.

She's right, you know. And her observation about how love dignifies God's creatures is soooooo true.

Reading this passage makes me yearn once againto share that Father's love with everyone, not just in word and deed but in prayer. And for those who are within my circle but not yet responsive to God's love, I especially pray today.

2 comments:

JustMe said...

Very true. "I desire mercy, not sacrifice." I know people who would send others to hell. But the Lord never wanted that for anyone. He loves us so much, He gave all to save us.

Phil B. said...

Interesting observation. My big struggle is not to love those outside of the Church but those within who, for whatever reason, have failed to realize the power of Divine Mercy in their own lives. But what you said goes for both.